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SKI & SNOWBOARD INFORMATION

Types of Lessons

3-Track Skiing

Visual and Hearing Impaired

2-Track Skiing

3-Track Skiing3-track skiing is stand up skiing using one full size ski and two hand-held outriggers for balance/support, giving the skier three points of contact with the snow. Three track skiers have one sound leg and two sound arms. Individuals with above the knee amputations and single lower limb weakness typically use this method of skiing. 3-track skiing requires a certain level of leg and arm strength and may not be for those who are in poor physical condition.

Visual and Hearing ImpairedSkiers learn to ski or snowboard using standard equipment with the assistance of a specifically trained guide.

2-Track Skiing2-track skiing is suitable for any skier who stands on two skis and does not require outriggers. The skier can stand and maintain balance while in motion, although adaptive equipment (tethers, spacers, ski bras, etc.) may be used to aid in leg strength. Two tracking is best suited to students with developmental and cognitive disabilities, mild cerebral palsy, visual impairment, and hearing impairment.

Bi-Skiing

Snowboarding

4-Track Skiing and the Snow Slider

Mono-SkiingMono skiing utilizes a bucket style seat with a single ski underneath it. An individual uses short hand held outriggers (metal elbow crutches with small skis on the end of them). Outriggers are used to aid balance and/or give support, requiring strong arms and good trunk balance. Individuals who have lower limb impairments and reasonable balance use mono-skis. People with brain trauma, post-polio, muscular dystrophy, cerebral palsy, multiple sclerosis, spina bifida, spinal cord injuries and double amputees are good candidates for mono-skiing.

 

Mono-ski users must weigh less than 200 lbs. at Santa Fe, 140 lbs. at Sandia Peak.

Bi-SkiingBi skiing utilizes a bucket style seat with two skis underneath it. A bi-ski can be skied independently like a mono ski using the same type of hand held outriggers (metal elbow crutches with small skis on the end of them), or can be skied with the assistance of an instructor using fixed outriggers and tethers (reins attached to the back of the bi-ski). Skiers turn by either moving their head and shoulders or by using hand-held outriggers. A bi-ski is often the choice of a new sit down skier before moving on to the mono ski.

 

The bi-ski is designed for those who use a wheelchair or have difficulty walking even when assisted by crutches, canes or walkers. The typical candidate for the bi-ski would be an individual with a mid to high level spinal cord injury, cerebral palsy, multiple sclerosis, spina bifida, muscular dystrophy, amputees, or other severe balance impairments.

 

Bi-ski users must weigh less than 200 lbs. at Santa Fe, 140 lbs. at Sandia Peak.

SnowboardingSnowboarding is an increasingly popular way to ride the snow. We encourage anyone that we can accommodate to try snowboarding with modifications and adaptations for various types of physical and cognitive disabilities. The demand for snowboarding lessons had grown faster than our ability to recruit snowboard instructors so space remains LIMITED.

4-Track Skiing and the Snow SliderFour-track skiing is stand up skiing using two skis with two hand-held outriggers for balance/support, giving the skier four points of contact with the snow. Outriggers are metal elbow crutches with skis on the ends, some having adjustable brakes to aid in speed control.

 

People with cerebral palsy, multiple sclerosis, post-polio, spinal cord injury, stroke, muscular dystrophy, spina bifida, and those with strength and balance issues are candidates for 4-track skiing.

 

The snow slider is another form of 4-track skiing for those with balance issues. Skis are mounted to the metal frame making it something like a walker with skis. The skier uses their own boots and skis, and is aided by instructors on either side. Snow slider availability is LIMITED.

Mono-Skiing

RATE INFORMATION

MEETING LOCATION

At Ski Santa Fe an accessible path connects handicap parking to the lodge. Around the building, the path ends at the Adaptive program building. On clear days allow 35 minutes from the Santa Fe Plaza to the ski area and an hour when it is snowy. If skiing at Sandia Peak, visitors using wheelchairs should park at the far north end of the parking lot and ride by snowmobile to the Adaptive Ski Program facility. Other visitors may use the stairs and meet in the building to the left of the main lodge.

Two Hour Private Lesson - $100

Two Hour Private Lesson - $100Includes one-on-one instruction, all equipment and ski lift ticket. Lessons begin at 10:00 a.m. Advance reservations are required. Private lessons can be arranged by choosing an option below. At least two weeks advanced notice is suggested to guarantee availability. Availability is limited during the Christmas and Spring Break holidays.

FILL OUT FORM ONLINE  •  CALL 505-954-1224  •  EMAIL US

ITEMS TO BRING

New Mexico can have full sun and blowing snow all in one day. It is best to dress in layers. Pack long underwear, turtlenecks, warm shirt, ski socks, waterproof pants, warm parka, waterproof gloves, sun screen, lip balm and a water bottle. Goggles and helmets are available for loan. Sit skiers should bring warm snow boots. The elevator at Santa Fe makes lodge dining and restrooms accessible.

Four Hour Private Lesson - $150

Four Hour Private Lesson - $150Includes one-on-one instruction, all equipment and ski lift ticket. Lessons begin at 10:00 am. Advance reservations are required. Private lessons can be arranged by choosing an option below. At least two weeks advanced notice is suggested to guarantee availability. Availability is limited during the Christmas and Spring Break holidays.

FILL OUT FORM ONLINE  •  CALL 505-954-1224  •  EMAIL US

ALTITUDE CONSIDERATIONS

For a quality ski experience, aerobic and strength conditioning before arrival is recommended. If at all possible try to arrange a few days to acclimate to the high altitude. To avoid altitude sickness drink plenty of water, eliminate caffeine and get a good night's sleep before skiing.

Multi-Week Program for
New Mexico Residents - $240

Multi-Week Program for NM REsidents - $240Program runs from late January through March and includes a weekly two-hour private lesson lift ticket and ski equipment. Scholarship money may be available for local residents. For more information choose an option to the right or call for ski area availability.

FILL OUT FORM ONLINE  •  CALL 505-954-1224  •  EMAIL US

Independent Skiers with Disabilities Not Requiring Lessons

Independent skiers with disablilities not requiring lessonsSki Santa Fe and Sandia Peak offer All-Day or Half-Day lift tickets at 50% off regular rate for those with documented proof of their disability. An acceptable form of documentation is a letter from your physician, specialist, special education teacher or therapist, dated on official letterhead, and including statement of your diagnosis and permanence of disability. Other forms of documentation may be a letter of award from a group you have affiliation with (Veterans Administration, Paralyzed Veterans of America, U.S. Disabled Ski Team...) Tickets are issued by Skier Services office only. If you require the assistance of a companion, the companion will also recieve a ticket 50% off regular rate. This discount is a courtesy of ski area management, not a privilege mandated by law.

FILL OUT FORM ONLINE  •  CALL 505-954-1224  •  EMAIL US

Link to Sandia Peak Ski Area Link to Ski Santa Fe

"Our Mission is to enhance the lives of children

and adults with disabilities through recreation."

Our program is made possible each season
by our primary sponsors, Sandia Peak & Ski Santa Fe.